Thursday, July 21, 2016

Inflammation Buster - Basil



One more herb tip from the Good Life pull-out.

One of the oldest cultivated herbs, basil could help fight some very modern problems, including arthritis and heart disease.  That's because one of its compounds blocks inflammation in the very same way that aspirin and ibuprofen do.  Much of the research has been done on 'holy basis' or tulsi, a stronger form of the herb that's common to Asia.  Sweet basis, in most grocery stores, contains compounds, too, especially in young leaves.

Diabetes - basil extract, available in capsule form in the supplement aisle, could help people with diabetes better manage their blood sugar levels.  Promising research suggests that it may help reduce the amount of glucose traveling around in the bloodstream.  Of course, talk to your doctor before taking it.

You can pack plenty of this healthy booster into a meal without overpowering everything, especially if you make pesto.  You can also use fresh leaves liberally in salads and tomato sauces.  Add them to your dish during the last few seconds of cooking; those healthy oils will be lost if overheated.

Saturday, July 16, 2016

Bacteria Fighter - Thyme



I didn't know this until I read it in a booklet that came with a copy of Good Life

Thyme is known as an antiseptic:  It contains thymol, also an ingredient in some mouthwashes.  One of Dr. Oz's favorite uses for this herb is this cough-suppressant recipe:  Place 4 Tbsp. of fresh or dried thyme in a saucepan; cover with 1 cup of boiling water; steep for 15 minutes; strain and add the juice of one lemon and 1/4 cup of raw honey.  Adults can take 1-2 Tbsp. every 3-4 hours.  This keeps in the fridge for up to a week.

Tame acne - Thyme can also fight the bacteria that causes acne.  Research found that a concentrated form of thyme zapped those bacteria better than benzoyl peroxide, the active ingredient in many acne products.  Some skin care products even contain one of the compounds in thyme.

Protect against cancer - the most exciting revelation about thyme has to do with its potential role in deterring cancer.  In preliminary research, one of the compounds it contains, called rosmarinic acid, has been found to help prevent tumor growth.

Cook smart - Fresh thyme adds dimension to soup, sauces, and salad dressings; toss it in at the end of cooking to best retain its flavor and healthy compounds.  Or steep the leaves in boiling water to make a refreshing tea.


Sunday, July 10, 2016

The Tummy Soother - Peppermint



A little peppermint can help you digest food without drama.  It helps relax the muscles of your stomach.  A stronger form, peppermint oil capsules (choose enteric-coated ones), may even relieve the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome.  But be careful if you have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Mint relaxes the valve at the bottom of the esophagus, so acid could come back up and make problems worse.

Ease cold and flue symptoms.  Peppermint contains menthol, one of the very same ingredients in chest rubs.  Inhaling mint's vapors can help loosen your congestion and calm your cough by thinning mucus, which is why peppermint tea can feel extra soothing when you have a cold.

Boost alertness.  A whiff of peppermint can make you feel more alert and less fatigued, which is especially useful when you're driving.  Dr. Oz tip:  Slip some peppermint gum in your bag before you head out.

Cook smart.  Mint pairs nicely with citrus fruit, yogurt, and lamb.  It's also great with roasted zucchini, or in chilled cucumber soup.  If you don't like this herb in your main course, brew tea by simply pouring hot water directly over several sprigs of mint.

Another tip from the insert in Dr. Oz's The Good Life.

Friday, July 8, 2016

The Brain Booster - Rosemary



Another helpful note from an insert found in Dr. Oz's 'The Good Life.'

Science has shown that the mere smell of the oil from rosemary may help improve your memory.  Try it for yourself.  Mix a drop of rosemary essential oil with the same amount of an oil such as coconut or olive.  Dab it on your wrist and sniff.  Did it work?

Make grilled foods healthier with rosemary.  Cooking meat at high temperatures creates cancer-causing compounds known as HCAs (heterocyclic animes).  But research has found that prepping meat in a marinade filled with rosemary can significantly reduce the formation of those nasty compounds.

Fight indigestion with rosemary-leaf capsules.  This is used in Europe to ease dyspepsia.  They're even approved for use there at doses of up to 4 to 6 grams by Germany's Commission E, a government agency that evaluates the medical evidence surrounding herbs.  And you should be able to find them in the US in the supplement aisle.

Cook smart with rosemary.  Savory dishes work well with this fragrant herb.  Think fresh tomato sauce, frittatas, and egg or tuna salad.  Another approach - puree fresh leaves with olive oil for a dipping sauce.

I think I'll pot plant some rosemary on my patio.  I've planted Rosemary in the yard and it's easy to grow.  Guess it's time to pull out a pot and grown some on my patio.

Thursday, July 7, 2016

Disease Fighters - Chives



Garlic and onions usually get all the credit in the family of plants believed to help prevent cancer but the chive is also packed with the compounds that may be effective.  Research suggests that one in particular called querctin could help inhibit certain tumor cells.  Men who ate the most from this plant family had lower rates of prostate cancer.

A compound in chives called allicin has been shown to lower the amount of bad cholesterol you produce, and to help keep your blood pressure low.  That could add up to lower risks of these prevalent heart and brain problems.

Chives also contain choline, a B vitamin that has been linked to better sleep, learning and memory and may ease depression.

Colonists brought chives to America for medicinal purposes.  Since then, chefs and home cooks have found plenty of other uses for them.  Kids who won't touch garlic or onions often will take to chives.  Use them to liven up your dips, salads, and omelets.

This information is from Dr. Oz's magazine The Good Life and I felt it a must to share.

Tuesday, July 5, 2016

Fruit Salad



Turn up that Fruit Salad by adding jello.  I had 2 small containers of jello in the refrigerator and wanted to find a use for them before their expiration date.  I had just made some citrus fruit salad and decided 'why not?' and cut it up, adding to to my salad.  Delicious!  Appealing to the kids! and Colorful!

Saturday, June 25, 2016

Gassiest Foods - Part 6 (End)



Sugar-Free Foods

Sometimes the thing that is giving us gas is something we have not paid any attention to. Many people do not know that a big gas-producer is sugar-free gum. 


Many sugar-free food products contain sorbitol, which can be fermented by gut bacteria, resulting in unwanted gas. Read labels carefully when purchasing sugar-free gums, candy, and snack foods to ensure that they don't contain sorbitol. 

Friday, June 24, 2016

Gassiest Foods - Part 5



Gassiest Drinks

The following beverages may contain fructose, sorbitol, or carbonation, all of which can contribute to intestinal gas:

Beer
Fruit juices

Soda (regular and diet) 

Thursday, June 23, 2016

Gassiest Foods - Part 4



Whole Grains

Although whole grains contain some helpful vitamins and are a source of dietary fiber, the soluble fiber content of some, as well as the presence of  raffinose, a type of sugar, can create intestinal gas. Here are those to avoid when if you don't want to experience unwanted gassiness.

Barley
Flax seed
Rye

Wheat

Tuesday, June 21, 2016

Gassiest Foods - Part 3




Gassiest Dairy Products

Even if you have not been diagnosed with lactose intolerance, you may find that eating dairy products results in unwanted gas. As our bodies age, we tend to produce less of the enzyme lactase that is necessary for digesting lactose (the sugar found in milk and other dairy products), and thus gassiness resulting from dairy foods may become a problem. Here are some dairy products to skip to avoid having gas:

Buttermilk
Cream cheese
Heavy cream
Ice cream
Milk
Processed foods containing milk products

Ricotta

Monday, June 20, 2016

Gassiest Foods - Part 2



Gassiest Fruits

The following fruits have a reputation for being gas-producing as they contain fructose, sorbitol and/or soluble fiber. Again, these fruits are good for you, so try to eat them on days when it is okay if you are a little gassier than usual.

Gassy Fruits:
Apples
Apricots
Mango
Oranges
Peaches
Pears
Plums
Watermelon

Dried fruits:
Apricots
Prunes

Raisins

Sunday, June 19, 2016

Gassiest Foods - Part 1



This information came from a site titled Very Well.  I just had to share.  

Gassiest Vegetables and Legumes

The following vegetables are those most likely to give you gas due to the fact that they contain raffinose and/or fructose. Remember these vegetables are actually very good for you, so just avoid them on those occasions when you absolutely need to be gas-free.

Gassy Vegetables:
Artichokes
Asparagus
Broccoli
Brussel sprouts
Cabbage
Cauliflower
Celery
Onions
Peas
Sweet potatoes

Gassiest Legumes:
Baked beans
Black beans
Black-eyed peas
Butter beans
Cannelinni (white) beans
Kidney beans
Lima beans
Navy beans

Friday, June 17, 2016

What NOT to Say to Someone Dieting



This info comes from a site that I love.  It was recommended to me by my doctor and is called My Fitness Pal.  If you're like me you've heard most if not all of these said while dieting.

When someone in your life is in the process of losing weight, what should you do? Should you draw attention to the weight loss and applaud the person, or should you de-emphasize it and avoid talking about it? The knee-jerk reaction is often to compliment and praise people for how great they look and for all their hard work. But is hearing those things truly helpful?

As a registered dietitian nutritionist, I’ve worked with hundreds of people who have successfully shed pounds. To my surprise, many of them have related the same message: They don’t like it when people notice and talk about their weight loss. They don’t want to be complimented, praised or even have attention drawn to them. Instead of having every conversation revolve around their pants size, they want to talk about other things with their friends and loved ones.

For people on the sidelines wanting to show support and love, it can be hard to understand why someone wouldn’t want to hear words of encouragement. It can be challenging to put yourself in that position and understand how someone might misinterpret your well-intentioned comments.
There are people who love to get positive comments and feedback about their weight-loss progress. Not everyone is sensitive to words of encouragement, but it’s more common than you’d think to have a negative reaction.

Let’s dive into the top five things you probably shouldn’t say to someone who is losing weight.

“How much more do you have to lose?” This is problematic because it assumes they couldn’t possibly be happy with where they are now. Different people have different weights at which they are comfortable, so who are we to judge?

“You probably don’t want to eat that, right?” Foods that are high in fat or sugar are often vilified. A person who is actively losing weight might have it built into their plan to enjoy or indulge in those foods occasionally. The last thing you want to do as a support in their life is increase food anxiety or induce guilt about eating certain things. Trust them, and don’t critique their food choices.

“You look so much better than before.” This is clearly not the most helpful thing to say to someone, but it does occasionally slip out of our mouths. Avoid comparing their appearance from before and after. Chances are, they’re already doing enough of that in their own head. If they want your opinion, they can ask!

“You’re just going to gain it back anyway.” This statement conveys a lack of confidence in your loved one’s ability to maintain weight loss and could be very discouraging to hear. It’s disheartening even if you meant it as a joke.


“Wow, you look so good!” This is the real kicker. People say this all the time and usually have nothing but good vibes they’re trying to send. This can be interpreted in many problematic ways, though. People often wonder what was wrong with them before or why everyone is noticing their body. This well-meaning statement can cause body-image issues to surface, which can — in the worst case — trigger an eating disorder.

Wednesday, June 15, 2016

What's the Best Fish for You?



This is just part of an article I read on Sparkpeople.  If you're a fish/seafood lover, you might want to read the rest of this article.  It not only covers the omegas but also the contaminants, environmental concerns and gives you a general guideline for fish and your health.  This is well worth going to this site to read.

What's the Best Fish for You?

Word is spreading that fish is good for your health, but like many matters of health and nutrition, there’s nothing simple about simply eating fish. Even though many varieties can be good for your health, contaminants such as mercury and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB), found in many types of fish, may be detrimental to your health.

But it gets even more complicated. Beyond choosing fish based on healthfulness (considering things like abundance of healthy omega-3 fatty acids and low concentrations of mercury and contaminants), consuming fish also has an environmental impact. Many environmental advocates have reported that the mismanagement of many large-scale fishing operations has resulted in overfishing (and the plummeting of some wild fish populations). Fish farming, one alternative to wild fish, may help protect these populations, but other groups claim that fish farming has led to other problems, like the overuse of antibiotics to control disease.

Trying to keep track of which types of fish are healthy and safe—not only for you, but also for the environment—can be daunting, to say the least. And here’s why: Making the right choice when it comes to fish means looking for fish that have the highest nutritional content, lowest levels of contaminants, and, for those concerned with the environment, the lightest impact on the planet. Let's explore how to make the best choices to meet all of these tricky requirements.

Nutrition and Omega-3s
Nutrients found in foods are usually straightforward.  When choosing fish, people generally want to know which types are highest in omega-3 fatty acids. Concerning omega-3s alone, the following chart ranks the omega-3s in fish from highest content to lowest.
 
Species
3 oz edible portion
Grams
Omega-3
Mackerel, Atlantic
2.6
Chub
2.6
Herring
2.5
King Mackerel
2.2
Chub Mackerel
2.2
Trout, lean lake
2.1
Spiny Dogfish
2.0
Trout, lake
2.0
Salmon, Atlantic, farmed
1.9
Herring, pacific
1.8
Whitefish
1.8
Herring, Atlantic
1.7
Bluefin Tuna
1.6
Chinook Salmon
1.5
Sablefish
1.5
Albacore Tuna
1.5
Whitefish, lake
1.5
Sturgeon, Atlantic
1.5
Canned Sardines
1.4
Pink Salmon
1.0
Smelt
1.0
Striped Bass
0.8
Pollock
0.5
Catfish
0.5
Halibut, Pacific
0.5
Catfish or Cod
0.3
Flounder or Perch
0.2
Snapper or Grouper
0.2
Sole
0.1


Friday, June 10, 2016

A Daily Cup of Tea and Your Health - Part 2 (End)



6. Tea may keep your smile bright
"Japanese researchers have found that tea can decrease tooth loss," Ardine says. "It changes the pH in your mouth when you drink it and that may be what prevents cavities." Beyond that, tea, unlike many other beverages does not appear to erode tooth enamel, Bonci says.

7. Tea may boost the immune system
Studies have shown tea can tune up immune cells so they reach their targets quicker.

8. Tea may help battle cancer
Studies on this are currently mixed, which means more research is needed, Bonci says. But, in the meantime, "if you've got a strong family history of cancer and you want to do anything you can, you might increase your tea consumption," she adds.

9. Herbal tea may soothe the digestive system
"Herbal teas, in particular chamomile, can be good for people with irritable bowel syndrome because it is an antispasmodic," Bonci says. "And ginger teas can calm nausea."

10. Tea — unadulterated, that is — is calorie free

"It's a great no-calorie alternative to water," Bonci says. "It provides so many options for flavor and versatility. You can have it hot or cold. And you don't have to put anything in it, though you might want to add a cinnamon stick or some ginger. That means you're able to hydrate with something other than water alone."

Thursday, June 9, 2016

A Daily Cup of Tea and Your Health - Part 1



I found this on Today.com and since I love tea I thought there might be others out there that enjoy it as much as I do.  Now we have a good reason to indulge in our tea.  This is part 1 of 2 parts.

No matter what the season, tea can be a tasty beverage since it can be served iced or hot.
But its benefits go far beyond refreshment. There is plenty of research showing that drinking tea can actually improve your health.

At the very least, it's a flavorful way of getting enough fluid into your body each day. On top of that, studies have shown teas can help protect your teeth and your heart, as well as possibly even helping to stave off cancer.

Which type of tea you drink can make a difference. All non-herbal teas are made from the leaves of the Camellia sinensis plant. The amount of time the leaves are processed determines whether you end up with a green, black or oolong tea.

The green teas are the least processed and tend to have the highest amounts of polyphenols, and the only type that contain the polyphenol, catechin, which is why many studies have been done using only green teas. Certain herbal teas are known for their medicinal values, including soothing the digestive system.

1. Tea contains antioxidants
Antioxidants work to prevent the body's version of rust and thus help to keep us young and protect us from damage from pollution.

2. Tea has less caffeine than coffee
Herbal blends have no caffeine, while traditional teas have less than 50 percent of what typically is found in coffee. That means you can consume it without those pesky effects on your nervous system, says Leslie Bonci, nutritionist and owner of Active Eating Advice.

3. Tea may reduce your risk of heart attack and stroke
"There's a lot of literature out there on tea and heart health," says Anna Ardine, clinical nutrition manager at Magee-Womens Hospital of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. "This is a health effect for which there is the strongest evidence."

In fact, a study published earlier this year that combined data from a host of earlier reports found a nearly 20 percent reduction in the risk of heart attack and a 35 percent reduced risk of stroke among those who drank one to three cups of green tea a day. Those who drank four or more cups of green tea daily had a 32 percent reduction in the risk of having a heart attack and lower levels of LDL cholesterol.

4. Tea may help with weight loss
Research on this isn't as strong, Ardine says, adding that studies that have shown an effect have depended on consumption of large amounts of tea, often in pill form.

5. Tea may help protect your bones

Data from recent animal studies has shown that green tea may prevent bone loss.

Saturday, June 4, 2016

What Causes Heart Disease? - Part 3 (End)



Other Major Risk Factors
The following risk factors are largely controllable. Some people think of them as "symptoms" of heart disease, where others may view them as precursors.

High blood pressure (hypertension). Uncontrolled blood pressure can increase the workload of your heart, as well as harden and thicken the arteries, making it harder for blood to pass through. According to the AHA, high blood pressure coupled with other risk factors like obesity, smoking, high cholesterol or diabetes increases the risk of heart attack and stroke several times over. In many cases, high blood pressure can be controlled through lifestyle changes and medications.
 
High cholesterol. As cholesterol levels rise, so does your risk for cardiovascular disease. High cholesterol (especially high levels of LDL or "bad" cholesterol) can lead to artery blockage and damage, which contributes to heart disease and can lead to a heart attack. If you have high cholesterol along with other risk factors (like high blood pressure or tobacco use), you are at a much higher risk for heart disease. While some people are genetically predisposed to high cholesterol levels, lifestyle changes and medications can help control cholesterol levels.
 
Type 2 diabetes. People who have type 2 diabetes are twice as likely to experience heart disease or stroke—even if it is well managed. 65% of people with diabetes die of some form of cardiovascular disease, according to the AHA. If poorly managed, the risk is much higher, as uncontrolled blood sugar levels can damage the heart and veins. Type 2 diabetes is preventable. If you have diabetes, it's extremely important to work with your healthcare provider to manage your condition and reduce any other risk factors you may have.

Some of these risk factors put you at greater risk of heart disease than others. The more risk factors you have, the higher your chances of developing heart disease. The good thing is that you can break that chain of progressive disease at any point by working to reduce your controllable risk factors. You should work closely with your doctor to develop a heart-smart plan that is safe and effective for you. These plans usually involve some combination of dietary changesexercise, medication and weight loss.


Friday, June 3, 2016

What Causes Heart Disease? - Part 2




Controllable Risk Factors

Factors that you can control are related to your lifestyle—the choices you make each day about what to eat and whether or not to exercise. These are areas of your life where you can take control to reduce your risk of heart disease and enhance your overall health.

Smoking. Most people think of lung cancer when they think of smoking, but did you know that smoking is the leading preventable cause of heart disease and heart attack? People who smoke are 2-4 times more likely to develop heart disease than non-smokers, according to the AHA. Smoking damages the walls of your arteries, constricts blood vessels, and lowers your HDL (good) cholesterol levels. Quitting smoking can stop (and potentially reverse) a lot of the existing damage to your body. The American Lung Association says that after one year of quitting, an ex-smoker's heart disease risk is half that of a smoker's, and after 15 years without lighting up, it's as low as a nonsmoker's. Don't smoke? Good! But stay away from tobacco smoke anyway. Exposure to secondhand smoke increases the risk of heart disease even for nonsmokers.
 
Your diet. A diet that's high in saturated fat, trans fat, sodium, added sugars, cholesterol can raise your cholesterol and blood pressure levels and increase your risk of heart disease. Some research shows that diets too high in animal-based foods (meat and high-fat dairy products) and too low in plant-based foods like whole grains, fruits, vegetables and nuts can lead to heart disease, too. Learn more about the foods that help fight heart disease. 

Your activity level. If you're inactive, you're almost twice as likely to develop heart disease as people who get moving on a regular basis, reports the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI). Regular exercise naturally decreases the LDL (bad) cholesterol levels in your blood while increasing your HDL (good) cholesterol levels. It also lowers blood pressure and helps with blood sugar control, not to mention that exercise strengthens the heart  and cardiovascular system so that it is more efficient. Exercise does not have to be strenuous to offer benefits.  

Your weight. The more excess body fat you have, the greater your risk of heart disease and heart attack—even if you have no other risk factors. Being overweight increases your blood LDL (bad) cholesterol and triglyceride levels, lowers HDL (good) cholesterol, and exacerbates other heart disease risks like diabetes and high blood pressure. Plus, carrying excess weight simply puts additional strain on the heart, forcing it to work harder. Calculating your body mass index (BMI) is one way to determine if you are overweight; losing just 10% of your body weight (if you are overweight) can improve your heart health.
 
Stress. Experts aren't sure why people with chronic stress have higher rates of heart disease, but they believe that stress (and the hormones it releases) may damage the arteries over time and make blood clots more likely to form. Just one stressful episode can elevate the heart rate and blood pressure for a short period, and even lead to a heart attack. Some people find unhealthy ways to deal with stress, such as overeating, smoking, or drinking (all risk factors in their own right). Identifying your stressors and dealing with them in a healthy way can help protect your heart.
 

Your drinking habits. Drinking too much—and possibly too little—seems to increase one's risk of heart disease. People who drink moderately (defined as an average of one drink day for women and two drinks daily for men) have a lower risk of heart disease than nondrinkers. However, the AHA does not recommend that teetotalers start drinking (or that drinkers increase the amount they drink) in order to achieve these purported benefits. Drinking too much has far more risks than not drinking. Too much alcohol can raise blood pressure and triglycerides, as well as contribute to obesity, irregular heartbeat, cardiomyopathy, alcoholism, heart failure, cancer, stroke and other diseases. To protect your heart, cut back on drinking; if you don't drink often—or at all—don't start. 

Thursday, June 2, 2016

What Causes Heart Disease? - Part 1



This is an article from Spark People that I wanted to share.  It will be sent in 3 parts.

Are You At Risk for Heart Disease?

Uncontrollable Risk Factors

These variables are out of your control. Although you can't do anything to change them, it's important to know whether you fall into any of these higher-risk categories. How many of these risk factors do you exhibit?

Your age. Men over 45 and women over 55 are more likely to develop heart disease than their younger counterparts. The American Heart Association (AHA) states that more than 83 percent of people who die of coronary heart disease are 65 or older. Why? Plaque begins to slowly deposit in the arteries starting in childhood, so simply getting older increases your risk of developing heart disease and having a heart attack. The older you get, the more likely you are to have damaged arteries and/or a weakened heart muscle. Most people have plaque buildup in the arteries by the time they reach their 70s, according to the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, but only about one-quarter of these people will exhibit signs or symptoms of cardiovascular disease.
 
Your sex. Overall, more men have heart attacks than women do, and they experience them earlier in life, too. While a woman's risk of dying from heart disease increases after menopause, it's still lower than a man's.
 
Your family history. If people in your family have heart disease—especially close or immediate relatives, your risk of developing it increases. If a parent or sibling developed heart disease at an early age (before age 55 for men, or before age 65 for women), your risk is even higher.

Developing heart disease isn't necessarily in your DNA, however. Lifestyle habits (diet, exercise, smoking, drinking, etc.) tend to be passed down from generation to generation, which means that some portion of this risk is controllable.
 
Your race. Somewhat related to family history, your race can also predetermine part of your risk of heart disease. African Americans, American Indians, Mexican Americans, and native Hawaiians are more likely to have heart disease than Caucasians, but this is partly due to other risk factors that these populations tend to experience, such as diabetes and high blood pressure.
 
Your body type. Whether or not you become overweight or obese is mostly within your control, but you cannot control your weight distribution, which refers to where your body stores fat. For years, experts warned that people who tend to carry excess weight in their belly area (known as "apple" shapes) are at a greater risk of several health problems, including heart disease, while "pear" shaped bodies that store more fat in the lower body don't have the same risk.


However, one 2010 study published in The Lancet dispelled that idea, saying that being overweight (regardless of where your body stores the fat) is a heart disease risk factor. Your genetics determine your body type; if you are apple-shaped now, you will always be apple-shaped, even if you lose weight. Still, maintaining a healthy body weight—which would decrease your waist circumference—is a controllable risk factor (more on that below) that can reduce your heart disease risk.

Tuesday, May 31, 2016

Sunscreen - Part 7 (End)



7. A bigger price tag doesn't equal better results.  Price sunscreen is not necessarily more effective.

One of the most interesting results from The Sweethome's study is that a pricier sunscreen is no more effective than a drugstore find.

Sunscreens that are more expensive are packed with expensive but irrelevant ingredients (think extracts and fragrances) that are not present in high enough amounts to make a difference in effectiveness.

There's also the issue of branding. According to Johnston, products with a fancy French name or a couture design house might not sell an inexpensive bottle of sunscreen simply to stay on brand. The moral of the story? Don't buy tiny expensive bottles you're afraid to use liberally.